Breast Ultrasound Specialist in Gainesville, FL

Diagnostic Mammogram in Gainesville, FL

Diagnostic mammograms are specialized mammograms designed to solve a particular problem. The radiologist designs each exam in order to answer the particular question at hand. The Gainesville Women’s Center for Radiology was the first center to provide patients with same day results and with over 35 years of experience we are committed to providing women in and around North Central Florida with excellent care using the most advanced technology available.

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Reasons to have a diagnostic mammogram:

  • Question arising from a screening mammogram
  • Symptoms in the breast such as a lump, focal breast pain or nipple discharge
  • Follow-up exams
  • Personal history of breast cancer

In addition to the four views obtained in a screening mammogram, there are many specialized views that are possible to further investigate a finding. The most common view is called a “spot compression magnification” view. This is a magnified view of a particular area of the breast. The radiologist may also want to do an ultrasound.

Breast Ultrasound

Ultrasound uses sound waves to generate a picture of the breast tissue. No compression is necessary. Ultrasound is particularly useful in telling cysts from solid masses in the breast. Cysts are very common and totally benign; about half of all women have some cysts in their breasts at some point. Ultrasound is also very helpful in characterizing masses and lumps.

Sometimes we do find a lesion that requires a biopsy to find out what it is. Fortunately, the vast majority of breast biopsies can be accurately performed with a needle and do not require surgery. Depending on the finding, a needle biopsy is performed, using either stereotactic (mammogram), ultrasound, or MRI guidance.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast

MRI is a technique using a very strong magnet and radio waves to pick up signals from the breast tissue. We use state-of-the-art equipment including a dedicated bilateral breast surface coil. The patient lies face-down within the scanning field for approximately 25 minutes. The primary way that abnormal tissue stands out on MRI is because it gets more blood flow than the remaining tissue. We can detect blood flow by taking images before and after infusion of an intravenous substance (gadolinium) that is easily seen on MRI. Breast MRI is most useful in detecting breast cancer and evaluating the integrity of implants. Breast MRI is often employed in patients with a known breast cancer in whom there is a question about how extensive the disease is. Medical indications (reasons) for breast MRI are evolving, and are the subject of many studies around the country.

We utilize a special computer-assisted detection (CAD) program designed for the processing and interpretation of Breast MR Images.

Ductography

A ductogram, also called a galactogram, is a test done if you are having persistent nipple discharge from a single duct, and your mammogram is normal. A tiny tube is inserted into the duct and a tiny amount of iodine contrast dye is injected into the duct. Several mammogram pictures are then obtained, with the ducts outlined by the iodine contrast dye. This shows whether there is anything inside the duct which could be producing the discharge. Most women report that this is not painful. When the duct is filled with fluid, it may feel a cramping sensation similar to what many women experience with their menstrual cycle.

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Galactography (Ductography)

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) – Breast

 English | Spanish

 

Mammography

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Breast Ultrasound

English | Spanish

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